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Material-UI Components: A Guide to Building Beautiful Interfaces

Building Beautiful Interfaces with Material-UI Components

Material-UI is a popular React UI library that provides developers with a comprehensive set of components and features for creating visually appealing and functional user interfaces. Material-UI reduces the barrier to entry for back-end developers and less technical designers, empowering teams to collaborate more effectively.

In this beginner’s guide, we will explore the core concepts of Material-UI and learn how to use react material-UI components effectively. Whether you are new to Material-UI or already have some experience, this guide will provide you with valuable insights and practical tips for building beautiful web applications using material-UI components.

Getting Started with Material-UI

To get started with using React Material-UI components, you first need to install the necessary packages. You can do this by running the following command:

bash
$ npm install @material-ui/core

Once the installation is complete, you can import the desired material-UI components from the start using them in your code. For example, if you want to use a Button component, you can import it as follows:

javascript
import Button from '@material-ui/core';


Now, let’s take a look at a basic example of using the Button component:

javascript

import React, {Component} from 'react';

  import './App.css';

    import Button from '@material-ui/core/Button';

      class App extends Component {

        render(){

      return (

      <div className="App">

      <br />

      <Button variant="contained" color="primary"

      size="large">

      GeeksforGeeks

      </Button>

      </div>

      );

    }

  }

export default App;


In the above example, we imported the Button component from Material-UI and rendered it within the App component. We set the variant prop to “contained” and the color prop to “primary” to create a button with a solid background color.


But what if you want to customize the appearance of your buttons? Material-UI provides various props that allow you to tweak their style. For instance, you can change the size of a button by setting the size prop:

javascript

<Button variant="contained" color="primary" size="large">

  Click me!

</Button>

You can also use the classes prop to add custom CSS classes to the button:

javascript

<Button variant="contained" color="primary" classes={{ root: 'custom-button' }}>

  Click me!

</Button>


By using these customization options, you can easily adapt Material-UI components to fit your specific design requirements.


Core Concepts in Material-UI

Before we dive deeper into using react material-UI components, it’s essential to understand the core concepts behind the library. Material-UI follows the principles of Material Design, a visual language introduced by Google. These principles include:


1. Material is the metaphor: Material Design draws inspiration from the physical world, such as paper and ink, to create interfaces that feel tangible and responsive. It emphasizes surfaces that reflect light and cast shadows.


2. Bold, graphic, intentional: Material Design uses typography, grids, space, scale, color, and imagery to create hierarchy, meaning, and focus in digital interfaces. It employs a bold and graphic style to make elements stand out intentionally.


3. Motion provides meaning: Motion is used in Material Design to guide user attention and maintain continuity between different states or screens. Transitions and animations give meaning to user interactions and help users understand how elements relate to each other.


By adhering to these principles, Material-UI allows developers to create visually appealing and user-friendly interfaces while maintaining consistency with the Material Design guidelines.

Types of Material UI Components are:

  1. Core Components:

  • ThemeProvider: Wrap your entire application and provide a theme context to all components, to customize the theme’s colors, typography, and other design properties.

  • Typography: Display text with various typographic styles like headings, paragraphs, and captions.

  • Button: Make use of various types of buttons, including raised buttons, outlined buttons, and text buttons.

  • Icon: Display icons from popular icon libraries like Material Icons or Font Awesome.

  • Paper: Create a paper-like surface to group content or apply elevation to elements.

  • Card: Utilize a container for organizing content and displaying cards with titles, text, and media.

  • Divider: Render a horizontal line to separate content.

  • List: Display lists of items, often in a navigation menu or sidebar.

  • Tooltip: Add tooltips to elements with additional information.

  • Popover: Display content in a pop-up overlay.

  1. Navigation Components:

  • AppBar: A top-level app bar component that can contain branding, navigation items, and actions

  • Tabs: Allows you to create tabbed navigation

  • Drawer: A slide-out or persistent side navigation panel

  • Menu: A display menu of options triggered by a button or other user actions

  • Stepper: A step-by-step process indicator

  1. Form Components:

  • TextField: Input fields for text, numbers, and other forms of input

  • Checkbox and Radio: Input elements for selecting options

  • Select: A dropdown select input

  • Slider: A slider input for selecting values within a range

  • DatePicker and TimePicker: Date and time pickers

  • Autocomplete: A suggestion provider while typing in an input field

  • Switch: A toggle switch

  • FormLabel and FormControl: Components for form labeling and control grouping

Theming and styling in Material-UI is a powerful feature that allows us to customize the visual appearance of your application to match your design preferences. Material-UI uses a theme object and a variety of styling techniques to achieve this flexibility.

Exploring Material-UI Components

Material-UI offers a wide range of components that cover various UI elements typically found in web applications. Let’s explore some of the key react material-UI components:

Typography


Typography plays a vital role in UI design, conveying information effectively and establishing visual hierarchy. Material-UI provides a Typography component that allows you to display text with consistent styling based on predefined variants. You can use this component to render headings, paragraphs, captions, and other textual content.


Here’s an example of using the Typography material-UI component:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Typography } from '@material-ui/core';

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <Typography variant="h1">Heading 1</Typography>

      <Typography variant="body1">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.</Typography>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


In the above example, we imported the Typography component and used it to render a heading and a paragraph. We specified the variant prop to define the desired typography style. Material-UI provides several pre-defined variants such as “h1”, “h2”, “body1”, “body2”, and more.

Buttons


Buttons are an essential material-UI component in any user interface as they enable users to interact with the application. Button components can be easily customized to fit various design requirements. You can change the appearance of buttons by tweaking their props, such as variant, color, size, and disabled state.


Let’s explore some customization options for buttons:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button } from '@material-ui/core';

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <Button variant="contained" color="primary">

        Primary Button

      </Button>

      <Button variant="outlined" color="secondary">

        Secondary Button

      </Button>

      <Button variant="text" disabled>

        Disabled Button

      </Button>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


In the above example, we created three different buttons: a primary button with a solid background color (“contained” variant), a secondary button with an outlined border (“outlined” variant), and a disabled button (“text” variant). By using these variants, you can create buttons that match your application’s visual style.

Icons


Icons are widely used in web applications to represent actions, objects, or concepts. Material-UI provides a built-in icon system that allows you to easily render icons in your application. You can use Material Icons provided by Google, or you can import custom SVG icons.


Here’s an example of using icons in Material-UI:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Icon } from '@material-ui/core';

import { ShoppingCart } from '@material-ui/icons';

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <Icon color="primary">

        <ShoppingCart />

      </Icon>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


Here, we imported the Icon component and the ShoppingCart icon from the Material-UI icons library. We then used the Icon component to render the icon with the desired color (“primary” in this case). By combining the Icon component with material icons or custom SVG icons, you can enhance the visual appeal of your application.

Inputs and Forms


Forms are an integral part of many web applications as they allow users to input and submit data. Material-UI provides a range of components for handling form inputs, including TextField, Checkbox, RadioGroup, and Select.


Let’s take a look at an example of using form components:

import React from 'react';

import { makeStyles } from '@mui/styles';

import TextField from '@mui/material/TextField';

import Button from '@mui/material/Button';

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({

  root: {

    '& .MuiTextField-root': {

      margin: theme.spacing(2),

      width: '25ch',

    },

  },

  button: {

    margin: theme.spacing(2),

  },

}));

function MyForm() {

  const classes = useStyles();

  const handleSubmit = (event) => {

    event.preventDefault();

    // Add your form submission logic here

  };

  return (

    <form className={classes.root} onSubmit={handleSubmit}>

      <div>

        <TextField

          label="First Name"

          variant="outlined"

          fullWidth

          required

        />

      </div>

      <div>

        <TextField

          label="Last Name"

          variant="outlined"

          fullWidth

          required

        />

      </div>

      <div>

        <TextField

          label="Email"

          variant="outlined"

          fullWidth

          required

          type="email"

        />

      </div>

      <div>

        <TextField

          label="Password"

          variant="outlined"

          fullWidth

          required

          type="password"

        />

      </div>

      <Button

        type="submit"

        variant="contained"

        color="primary"

        className={classes.button}

      >

        Submit

      </Button>

    </form>

  );

}

export default MyForm;


In the code above:

  • We have imported various material-UI components. For eg – TextField for input fields and Button for form submission.

  • We have used the makeStyles hook for defining custom styles.

  • Inside the MyForm component, we have created a form with various inputs for first name, last name, email, and password.

  • We have attached an onSubmit event handler to the form to handle the form submission.

  • We have also added a “Submit” button that triggers the form submission.


By using these form components, you can easily create interactive and user-friendly forms in your Material-UI application.

Navigation Components

Navigation components are crucial for creating intuitive interfaces that allow users to navigate through different sections of a web application. Material-UI provides several navigation components, including AppBar, BottomNavigation, and Tabs.


Let’s explore how to use these navigation components:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { AppBar, Toolbar, Typography, BottomNavigation, BottomNavigationAction } from '@material-ui/core';

import { Home, Explore, AccountCircle } from '@material-ui/icons';

const App = () => {

  const [value, setValue] = React.useState('home');

  const handleChange = (event, newValue) => {

    setValue(newValue);

  };

  return (

    <div>

      <AppBar position="static">

        <Toolbar>

          <Typography variant="h6">

            Material-UI App

          </Typography>

        </Toolbar>

      </AppBar>

      

      <BottomNavigation value={value} onChange={handleChange}>

        <BottomNavigationAction label="Home" value="home" icon={<Home />} />

        <BottomNavigationAction label="Explore" value="explore" icon={<Explore />} />

        <BottomNavigationAction label="Profile" value="profile" icon={<AccountCircle />} />

      </BottomNavigation>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


Here, we created an AppBar component with a Toolbar and a Typography component. The AppBar serves as the top navigation bar for the application.


We also used the BottomNavigation component to create a bottom navigation bar. We defined multiple BottomNavigationAction components within the BottomNavigation to represent different sections of the application. The selected section is stored in the state variable “value”.


By incorporating these material-UI navigation components in your react application, you can enhance the user experience and make it easier for users to navigate through your app.

Dialogs and Modals


Dialogs and modals are commonly used in web applications to display important information or prompt user actions. Material-UI provides components like Dialog and Modal for creating these types of overlays.


Let’s see how to use these material-UI components:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button, Dialog, DialogTitle, DialogContent, DialogActions } from '@material-ui/core';

const App = () => {

  const [open, setOpen] = React.useState(false);

  const handleClickOpen = () => {

    setOpen(true);

  };

  const handleClose = () => {

    setOpen(false);

  };

  return (

    <div>

      <Button variant="contained" color="primary" onClick={handleClickOpen}>

        Open Dialog

      </Button>

      <Dialog open={open} onClose={handleClose}>

        <DialogTitle>Dialog Title</DialogTitle>

        <DialogContent>

          <Typography>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</Typography>

        </DialogContent>

        <DialogActions>

          <Button onClick={handleClose} color="primary">

            Close

          </Button>

          <Button onClick={handleClose} color="primary">

            Save

          </Button>

        </DialogActions>

      </Dialog>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


In the above example, we created a button that triggered the opening of a dialog when clicked. We managed the open state using React’s useState hook.


The Dialog component was used to create the dialog overlay. We set the open prop to control its visibility based on the state variable “open”. The dialog contains a DialogTitle, DialogContent, and DialogActions for displaying the title, content, and action buttons, respectively.


By utilizing these react material-UI components, you can create informative and interactive dialogs or modals in your web application.

Data Display Components


Data display components are used for presenting structured information in an organized manner.


Let’s take a look at how to use these material-UI components:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Table, TableHead, TableBody, TableCell, TableRow, Card, CardContent } from '@material-ui/core';

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <Card>

        <CardContent>

          <Typography variant="h6">User List</Typography>

          <Table>

            <TableHead>

              <TableRow>

                <TableCell>Name</TableCell>

                <TableCell>Email</TableCell>

                <TableCell>Role</TableCell>

              </TableRow>

            </TableHead>

            <TableBody>

              <TableRow>

                <TableCell>John Doe</TableCell>

                <TableCell>john.doe@example.com</TableCell>

                <TableCell>User</TableCell>

              </TableRow>

              {/ Add more rows /}

            </TableBody>

          </Table>

        </CardContent>

      </Card>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


In the above example, we used the Card and CardContent components to create a card that contains a table. The table was created using the Table, TableHead, TableBody, TableCell, and TableRow components. We defined the column names in the table head and populated the table body with data rows.


By incorporating these data display components in your Material-UI application, you can effectively present information in a structured and organized manner.

Advanced Components


Material-UI also offers advanced components that provide additional functionality and customization options. Some examples include Stepper for creating step-by-step processes, Snackbar for displaying notifications or messages, and Slider for selecting values within a range.


These advanced components can be used to enhance the user experience and add interactive features to your Material-UI application. You can explore the Material-UI documentation to learn more about these components and their usage.

Component Customization


While Material-UI components come with pre-defined styles, you can easily customize them to match your application’s design requirements. There are various ways to customize the styling of its components.

Overriding Default Styles


Material-UI components come with default styles that you can override using CSS or inline styles. You can use the makeStyles hook to define custom styles for specific components. Here’s an example:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button, makeStyles } from '@material-ui/core';

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({

  customButton: {

    backgroundColor: 'red',

    color: 'white',

    '&:hover': {

      backgroundColor: 'darkred',

    },

  },

}));

const App = () => {

  const classes = useStyles();

  return (

    <div>

      <Button className={classes.customButton}>Custom Button</Button>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


Here, we defined a custom style for the Button component using makeStyles. We set the background color to red and white, and specify a hover style. We then applied this style by adding the customButton class to the Button component.


By targeting specific CSS class names generated by Material-UI, you can easily override default styles and create unique designs for your components.

Custom Component Creation


In some cases, you may need to create custom components based on Material-UI building blocks. Material-UI provides a flexible architecture that allows you to extend or modify existing components to suit your needs.


For example, if you want to create a custom button component that combines multiple Material-UI components, you can use composition:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button, CircularProgress } from '@material-ui/core';

const CustomButton = ({ loading, disabled, ...rest }) => {

  return (

    <Button disabled={disabled || loading} {...rest}>

      {loading ? <CircularProgress size={24} /> : rest.children}

    </Button>

  );

};

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <CustomButton variant="contained" color="primary">Save</CustomButton>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


Here, we created a custom button component called CustomButton. It accepts the loading and disabled props and renders a Button component with a CircularProgress component if the loading prop is true.


By creating custom components, you can build complex UI elements that combine multiple Material-UI components and add custom functionality to your application.

Theming at a Component Level


Material-UI allows you to customize the theme at a component level using the withStyles higher-order component. With this approach, you can define specific styles for individual instances of a component within your application.


Here’s an example of using withStyles:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button, withStyles } from '@material-ui/core';

const styles = (theme) => ({

  customButton: {

    backgroundColor: 'blue',

    color: 'white',

    '&:hover': {

      backgroundColor: 'darkblue',

    },

  },

});

const CustomButton = withStyles(styles)(({ classes }) => (

  <Button className={classes.customButton}>Custom Button</Button>

));

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <CustomButton />

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


We defined a custom style using the styles function. We then used withStyles to apply this style to the CustomButton component. The resulting component will have the specified styles applied.


By leveraging theming at a component level, you can fine-tune the appearance of individual instances of components in your Material-UI application.

Implementing Responsive Design


Responsive design is important for creating web applications that adapt to different screen sizes and devices. Material-UI provides a responsive grid layout system based on CSS Flexbox that allows you to create responsive designs with ease.


The Grid material-UI component allows you to specify the number of columns a component should take up at different breakpoints. You can use props like xs, sm, md, and lg to define the desired layout.

Here’s an example of using the Grid component for responsive design:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Grid, Typography } from '@material-ui/core';

const App = () => {

  return (

    <div>

      <Grid container spacing={2}>

        <Grid item xs={12} sm={6} md={4}>

          <Typography>Item 1</Typography>

        </Grid>

        <Grid item xs={12} sm={6} md={4}>

          <Typography>Item 2</Typography>

        </Grid>

        <Grid item xs={12} sm={6} md={4}>

          <Typography>Item 3</Typography>

        </Grid>

      </Grid>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;


In the above example, we used the Grid component to create a responsive grid layout. We set the xs prop to 12, which means that each item will take up the full width on extra-small screens. On small screens (sm), each item will take up 6 columns, and on medium screens (md), each item will take up 4 columns.


By utilizing the Grid component and its responsive props, you can create flexible and adaptive layouts that look great on any device.

Routing and Navigation


Implementing routing and navigation is essential for creating multi-page applications. Material-UI works well with popular routing libraries like React Router to handle navigation within your application.


To get started with React Router and Material-UI, you need to install both libraries:

bash

$ npm install react-router-dom


Once installed, you can use React Router’s components like BrowserRouter, Route, and Link in conjunction with Material-UI components to create a navigation system.


Here’s an example of implementing routing and navigation with Material-UI and React Router:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route, Link } from 'react-router-dom';

import { AppBar, Toolbar, Typography } from '@material-ui/core';

const Home = () => <Typography variant="h1">Home Page</Typography>;

const About = () => <Typography variant="h1">About Page</Typography>;

const Contact = () => <Typography variant="h1">Contact Page</Typography>;

const App = () => {

  return (

    <Router>

      <AppBar position="static">

        <Toolbar>

          <Link to="/">

            <Typography variant="h6">Home</Typography>

          </Link>

          <Link to="/about">

            <Typography variant="h6">About</Typography>

          </Link>

          <Link to="/contact">

            <Typography variant="h6">Contact</Typography>

          </Link>

        </Toolbar>

      </AppBar>

      <Route path="/" exact component={Home} />

      <Route path="/about" component={About} />

      <Route path="/contact" component={Contact} />

    </Router>

  );

};

export default App;


In the above example, we imported the necessary components from React Router and Material-UI. We defined three different pages (Home, About, Contact) as functional components and used the Route component to associate each page with a specific URL path. The Link component was used to create navigation links in the AppBar.
By combining Material-UI and React Router, you can also create a seamless navigation experience in your application.
To create a navigation drawer in Material UI, we need to use the Drawer Component which creates a sidebar or drawer that contains navigation links.

Here’s an example of implementing Navigation Drawer:

import React from 'react';

import Drawer from '@mui/material/Drawer';

import List from '@mui/material/List';

import ListItem from '@mui/material/ListItem';

import ListItemText from '@mui/material/ListItemText';

const NavigationDrawer = ({ open, onClose }) => {

  return (

    <Drawer open={open} onClose={onClose}>

      <List>

        <ListItem button onClick={onClose}>

          <ListItemText primary="Home" />

        </ListItem>

        <ListItem button onClick={onClose}>

          <ListItemText primary="About" />

        </ListItem>

        <ListItem button onClick={onClose}>

          <ListItemText primary="Services" />

        </ListItem>

        <ListItem button onClick={onClose}>

          <ListItemText primary="Contact" />

        </ListItem>

      </List>

    </Drawer>

  );

};

export default NavigationDrawer;

Advanced Techniques on Material-UI

Material-UI offers advanced techniques that allow you to take your application to the next level. Let’s explore a few below:

Server-Side Rendering (SSR) with Material-UI

Server-Side Rendering (SSR) is the process of rendering a web page on the server and sending the pre-rendered HTML to the client. Material-UI provides support for SSR, allowing you to render your application’s UI on the server for improved performance and SEO.


To implement SSR with Material-UI, you can use libraries like Next.js or Gatsby. These frameworks provide built-in support for server-side rendering and work seamlessly with Material-UI.


By implementing SSR, you can improve the initial load time of your application and optimize it for search engine indexing.

Internationalization and Localization


Internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) are essential for creating web applications that cater to users from different countries and language preferences. Material-UI supports internationalization and localization through libraries like react-i18next.


React-i18next allows you to translate your application’s text content into different languages and handle language switching at runtime. You can easily integrate react-i18next with Material-UI components to provide a localized user experience.


By implementing i18n and l10n in your Material-UI application, you can make your app more accessible to users from around the world.

Animation and Transitions


Animations and transitions add visual interest and improve the overall user experience of an application. Material-UI provides a range of transition components that allow you to add motion to your components.


Let’s take a look at some examples of using transitions in Material-UI:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button, Fade } from '@material-ui/core';

const App = () => {

  const [open, setOpen] = React.useState(false);

  const handleClick = () => {

    setOpen((prev) => !prev);

  };

  return (

    <div>

      <Button onClick={handleClick}>Toggle Fade</Button>

      <Fade in={open}>

        <Typography variant="h6">Fading Text</Typography>

      </Fade>

    </div>

  );

};

export default App;

In the above example, we used the Fade component to create a fading effect for the Typography component. When the button is clicked, the Fade component in prop is toggled to control the visibility of the text.


Material-UI provides other transition components like Collapse, Grow, Slide, and Zoom, which you can use to create various animation effects in your application.

Theming with Dynamic Behavior


Material-UI’s theming capabilities allow you to customize the appearance of your application based on dynamic behavior. You can change theme variables based on user preferences or application states to create a more dynamic and personalized user experience.


For example, you can change the primary color of your theme based on a user’s color preference:

javascript

import React from 'react';

import { Button, createTheme, ThemeProvider } from '@material-ui/core';

const theme = createTheme({

  palette: {

    primary: {

      main: localStorage.getItem('colorPreference') || 'blue',

    },

  },

});

const App = () => {

  const handleColorChange = (color) => {

    localStorage.setItem('colorPreference', color);

    window.location.reload();

  };

  return (

    <ThemeProvider theme={theme}>

      <Button onClick={() => handleColorChange('red')}>Red</Button>

      <Button onClick={() => handleColorChange('green')}>Green</Button>

      <Button onClick={() => handleColorChange('blue')}>Blue</Button>

    </ThemeProvider>

  );

};

export default App;


Here, we defined a custom theme using createTheme. We set the primary color based on a color preference stored in localStorage. We provided buttons to change the color preference dynamically and reload the page to reflect the new color.


By leveraging theming with dynamic behavior, you can create a more interactive and personalized user experience in your Material-UI application. For your reference, you can also check out the below YouTube links to learn more about Material-UI. 


Here are some articles to learn more about Material-UI in depth.

Utilize the Power of Material UI Components

Material-UI provides a wide range of components and features that enable developers to build beautiful and functional user interfaces. In this beginner’s guide, we explored the core concepts of Material-UI and learned how to use its components effectively. We covered topics like theming, component customization, advanced techniques, and responsive design.

By following the best practices outlined in this guide, you can leverage Material-UI to create professional and visually appealing web applications. Below is a quick overview of the components and styling we studied in this guide. 

MUI Components Guide Table Pt. 1

FeatureDescription
What is Material-UI?Material-UI is a popular open-source React UI framework based on Google’s Material Design guidelines. It provides pre-designed UI components and styles for building modern web applications.
Core ComponentsMaterial-UI offers a wide range of core components such as buttons, inputs, tables, typography, and more, designed to help you create consistent and visually appealing user interfaces.
Theming and StylingMaterial-UI allows you to customize the visual appearance of your application through theming. You can create a custom theme with colors, typography, and spacing, and apply it globally to your components. Styling can be done using CSS-in-JS with makeStyles or by using the styled utility.
Responsive DesignMaterial-UI is built with responsive design in mind. It provides components and features that adapt to different screen sizes, making it suitable for both desktop and mobile applications.
Component CustomizationYou can easily customize Material-UI components by overriding their default styles, providing custom CSS classes, or creating custom variations using the styled utility.
Form HandlingMaterial-UI offers a range of form-related components like text fields, checkboxes, radios, selects, and date pickers. These components are designed to work seamlessly with forms and provide validation support.

Table Pt. 2

Navigation ComponentsMaterial-UI provides components like app bars, side drawers (navigation menus), tabs, and menus to help you create navigation and layout structures for your applications.
Data Display ComponentsYou can display data effectively using components such as tables, cards, avatars, and badges. These components help organize and present information to users.
Feedback ComponentsMaterial-UI includes components for displaying feedback to users, such as snackbar notifications and dialog boxes. These elements are essential for user interactions and notifications.
AccessibilityMaterial-UI places a strong emphasis on accessibility, making it easier for developers to create applications that are usable by a wide range of users, including those with disabilities.
Community and SupportMaterial-UI has a vibrant community and extensive documentation, including examples and usage guidelines, making it well-suited for both beginners and experienced developers.
Integration with ReactMaterial-UI is tightly integrated with React, making it a natural choice for building user interfaces in React applications.pu

Dive Deeper into MUI

So go ahead, dive deeper into Material-UI, and unlock the full potential of this powerful UI library!

Start by incorporating Material-UI into your next project and explore its extensive component library.

Experiment with different customization options and leverage the power of theming to create unique and visually stunning user interfaces.

Don’t forget to share your experience of using PureCode‘s Material-UI custom components with your community of developers.

Yash Poojari

Yash Poojari