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Exploring the Powerful Tool of Material UI Popover

Material UI Popover property allows you to create context menus, tooltips, and more. This comprehensive guide explores Material-UI Popover, features, usage, customization, and best practices.

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React Material ui popup state component – Video Resource

What is a Popover?

A Popover is a user interface element that displays additional information or options if triggered by user interaction (clicking or hovering). Material-UI Popover component provides an elegant way to create these PopUp elements in your React application.

Popovers are commonly used to display additional information, provide context-sensitive options, or offer tooltips, all while keeping the main user interface uncluttered.

Key Features of Material-UI Popover

Material-UI Popup state provides many key features to enhance your user interface and user experience in React applications. They include;

Positioning Control:

Material-UI Popover offers precise control over the placement of the Popover relative to its anchor element. You can specify the anchor’s position, and the Popover will adjust its position to fit within the viewport. It ensures that your Popovers always appear as intended.

Example:

<Popover
  anchorOrigin={{
    vertical: "bottom",
    horizontal: "center",
  }}
  transformOrigin={{
    vertical: "top",
    horizontal: "center",
  }}
>
  {/* Popover Content */}
</Popover>

Trigger Events:

You can define the user interaction that activates the Popover, allowing for various triggering mechanisms. Material-UI Popover provides flexibility in choosing how users should engage with the Popover, ensuring that it responds to different element use cases.

Example:

<Button onClick={handleOpen}>Open Popover</Button>

Custom Content:

One of the strengths of Material-UI Popover is its ability to house custom content. Populate the Popover with any React components, text, images, forms, or other elements. This makes it a versatile choice for displaying a wide range of contained content, including dynamic data and interactive elements.

Example:

<Popover>
  <div>
    <Typography>Custom Popover Content</Typography>
    <Button onClick={handleAction}>Submit</Button>
  </div>
</Popover>

Nested Popovers:

Nest Material-UI Popovers within one another, allowing for complex and multi-level interactions. This feature helps build sophisticated UIs that require a hierarchical structure of Popovers.

Example:

jsxCopy code
<Popover>
  {/* Content */}
  <Popover>
    {/* Nested Content */}
  </Popover>
</Popover>

Another key feature is the Transition Effect (More on this later.)

Getting Started with Material-UI Popover

With the knowledge of Popover and its features, let’s begin with the practical steps to incorporate it into your React project.

How to create a PopOver in React.

Importing Material-UI Popover

The first step is to have Material-UI installed in your project. You can do so using npm or yarn:

npm install @mui/material @mui/icons-material

After installation, proceed to import the necessary components for Popover into your React component:

import React from "react";
import Popover from "@mui/material/Popover";

Creating the Trigger Element Inside

A vital part of using Material-UI Popover is to define the element that triggers the Popover’s appearance. It could be a button, icon, or any other clickable or hoverable element within your application.

For example, you can use a Material-UI button like this:

import Button from "@mui/material/Button";

Initializing the Popover State

Create state variables and event handler functions to manage the Popover’s open and close state. These functions will be essential for controlling the appearance and disappearance of the Popover.

const [anchorEl, setAnchorEl] = React.useState(null);

const handleClick = (event) => {
  setAnchorEl(event.currentTarget);
};

const handleClose = () => {
  setAnchorEl(null);
};

By setting up this state, you have the foundation for managing the Popover’s visibility.

Rendering the Trigger Element inside

Render the trigger element with the event listener you just created. The event listener, in this case, is the handleClick function, which opens the Popover when the element is clicked:

<Button aria-describedby="simple-popover" onClick={handleClick}>
  Open Popover
</Button>

This button will trigger the Popover to open when clicked.

Defining the Popover Content

With the trigger element in place, you can now define the content you want to display within the Popover. The content can be any combination of text, images, forms, or other React components. Here’s an example:

const popoverContent = (
  <div>
    <Typography>Popover Content</Typography>
    {/* Add any other content here */}
  </div>
);

The popoverContent variable holds the JSX content that will appear within the Popover.

Rendering the Popover Component

one popover

Render the Popover component and connect it to the trigger element you defined:

<Popover
  open={Boolean(anchorEl)}
  anchorEl={anchorEl}
  onClose={handleClose}
  anchorOrigin={{
    vertical: "bottom",
    horizontal: "center",
  }}
  transformOrigin={{
    vertical: "top",
    horizontal: "center",
  }}
>
  {popoverContent}
</Popover>

In this code, you set several properties for the Popover component:

  • open: A boolean value that controls whether the Popover is open or closed.

  • anchorEl: The DOM element that serves as the anchor for the Popover.

  • onClose: A function to handle the Popover’s close event.

  • anchorOrigin and transformOrigin: These properties define the positioning of the Popover relative to the anchor element. You can customize these values to control the Popover’s placement.

With this, you have successfully set up and rendered a basic Material-UI Popover.

Basic Usage

Here’s a complete example of how to create a usage of Material-UI Popover in a React application:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@mui/material/Button";
import Popover from "@mui/material/Popover";
import Typography from "@mui/material/Typography";

function SimplePopover() {
  const [anchorEl, setAnchorEl] = useState(null);

  const handleOpen = (event) => {
    setAnchorEl(event.currentTarget);
  };

  const handleClose = () => {
    setAnchorEl(null);
  };

  const open = Boolean(anchorEl);
  const id = open ? "simple-popover" : undefined;

  return (
    <div>
      <Button aria-describedby={id} onClick={handleOpen}>
        Open Popover
      </Button>
      <Popover
        anchorEl={anchorEl}
        id={id}
        open={open}
        onClose={handleClose}
        anchorOrigin={{
          vertical: "bottom",
          horizontal: "center",
        }}
        transformOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "center",
        }}
      >
        <Typography>Hey there! This is the content of the Popover.</Typography>
      </Popover>
    </div>
  );
}

function App() {
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <SimplePopover />
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;

Above is a simple React application with a button. Clicking the “Open Popover” button displays the Popover content “(Hey there! This is the content of the Popover.)” Clicking anywhere outside the Popover closes it.

Customizing Material-UI Popover

Material-UI Popover is highly customizable, allowing you to tailor its appearance, behavior, and content to match your application requirements.

Styling

To customize the appearance of the Popover, you can utilize CSS-in-JS styling with the sx prop or apply external styles using CSS classes. For example, if you want to change the background color of the Popover, you can do so with the sx prop:

<Popover
  sx={{ background: "lightgray" }}
  // ...
>
  {popoverContent}
</Popover>

This gives the flexibility to adjust the Popover’s visual design as needed.

Customization Based on Interaction

Material-UI Popover is flexible, allowing you to change the Popover’s behavior based on various user interactions. For instance, you may want to show the Popover when a user hovers over the trigger element and hide it when the mouse pointer leaves the anchor element. You can achieve this by utilizing the onMouseEnter and onMouseLeave event handlers:

<Button
  aria-describedby="simple-popover"
  onMouseEnter={handleClick}
  onMouseLeave={handleClose}
>
  Hover for Popover
</Button>

Applying CSS Classes:

If you prefer external styles, you can apply CSS classes to the Popover component. It allows using your project’s CSS or apply custom styles defined in your stylesheets.

<Popover className="custom-popover">{/* Popover Content */}</Popover>

In your CSS or stylesheet:

.custom-popover {
  background-color: lightgray;
  padding: 16px;
  color: black;
}

The Popover opens when the mouse pointer enters the trigger element and closes when it leaves.

Conditional Styling:

You can conditionally style Popovers based on specific criteria, such as the content or the context in which they appear.

const isImportant = true;

<Popover sx={{ background: isImportant ? "red" : "lightgray" }}>
  {/* Popover Content */}
</Popover>;

Global Theme Customization:

Material-UI allows you to customize components globally by modifying the theme. Customize the Popover’s appearance by adjusting the theme variables that affect it.

import { ThemeProvider, createTheme } from "@mui/material/styles";

const theme = createTheme({
  components: {
    MuiPopover: {
      styleOverrides: {
        paper: {
          background: "lightgray",
          // Add more styles here
        },
      },
    },
  },
});

<ThemeProvider theme={theme}>
  <Popover>{/* Popover Content */}</Popover>
</ThemeProvider>;

Transition Effects

You can apply transition effects when opening and closing the Popover, enhancing the user experience with smooth animations. Material-UI provides the TransitionComponent and TransitionProps props for this purpose. You can specify your transition component to control the animation:

<Popover
  TransitionComponent={Fade}
  TransitionProps={{ timeout: 600 }}
  // ...
>
  {popoverContent}
</Popover>

The TransitionComponent can be set to a predefined Material-UI transition component like Fade, and you can adjust the animation duration with TransitionProps.

Custom Transition Effects:

Material-UI Popover provides the ability to use custom transition components. Create your transitions or use third-party animation libraries to achieve unique animation effects during Popover opening and closing.

import Slide from "@mui/material/Slide";

<Popover TransitionComponent={Slide} TransitionProps={{ direction: "up" }}>
  {/* Popover Content */}
</Popover>;

Transition Durations:

You can control the duration of the opening and closing transitions with the TransitionProps prop. It allows you to adjust the speed of the animations for a more dynamic or subtle effect.

<Popover TransitionProps={{ timeout: 600 }}>{/* Popover Content */}</Popover>

Best Practices for Using Material-UI Popover

While Material-UI Popover offers good flexibility, it’s vital to adhere to best practices to ensure a seamless user experience and maintainable code.

Accessibility

Make sure your Popover is accessible by providing appropriate ARIA attributes and labels. Use the aria-describedby attribute on the trigger element to associate it with the Popover content. This ensures that screen readers can provide the necessary context to users.

Responsive Design

Test Popover behavior on different screen sizes and orientations to ensure it adapts correctly. Responsive design is crucial to maintaining a consistent and user-friendly experience across various devices and viewports.

Content Size

Be mindful of the size and content you place within the Popover. Avoid overcrowding the Popover or causing the content overflow. It can lead to a cluttered and confusing user experience.

Performance

Optimize your code to ensure smooth interactions, especially when dealing with complex or frequently shown Popovers. Performance is a vital consideration, and excessive animations or heavy content can lead to slowdowns.

Testing

Thoroughly test your Popover component to identify and fix any issues or unexpected behavior. Extensive testing helps ensure that the Popover works in various scenarios.

Documentation

Document the usage and customization options of your Popover component for your team and future reference.

Common Use Cases

Material-UI Popover is a versatile component that can be applied to various use cases in your React applications. Here are some use cases for Material-UI Popover:

Tooltips:

To create a simple tooltip using Material-UI Popover, you can use the following code:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@mui/material/Button";
import Popover from "@mui/material/Popover";

function TooltipExample() {
  const [anchorEl, setAnchorEl] = useState(null);

  const handleOpen = (event) => {
    setAnchorEl(event.currentTarget);
  };

  const handleClose = () => {
    setAnchorEl(null);
  };

  const open = Boolean(anchorEl);

  return (
    <div>
      <Button
        aria-describedby={open ? "tooltip" : undefined}
        onMouseEnter={handleOpen}
        onMouseLeave={handleClose}
      >
        Hover for Tooltip
      </Button>
      <Popover
        id="tooltip"
        open={open}
        anchorEl={anchorEl}
        onClose={handleClose}
        anchorOrigin={{
          vertical: "bottom",
          horizontal: "center",
        }}
        transformOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "center",
        }}
      >
        <div>This is a tooltip.</div>
      </Popover>
    </div>
  );
}

export default TooltipExample;

In this example, when you hover over the “Hover for Tooltip” button, a Popover appears with the text “This is a tooltip.”

Context Menus:

To create a context menu with MUI Popover, you can use the following code:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@mui/material/Button";
import Popover from "@mui/material/Popover";

function ContextMenuExample() {
  const [anchorEl, setAnchorEl] = useState(null);

  const handleOpen = (event) => {
    setAnchorEl(event.currentTarget);
  };

  const handleClose = () => {
    setAnchorEl(null);
  };

  const open = Boolean(anchorEl);

  return (
    <div>
      <Button
        aria-describedby={open ? "context-menu" : undefined}
        onClick={handleOpen}
      >
        Right-click for Context Menu
      </Button>
      <Popover
        id="context-menu"
        open={open}
        anchorEl={anchorEl}
        onClose={handleClose}
        anchorOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "right",
        }}
        transformOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "left",
        }}
      >
        <div>
          <ul>
            <li>Option 1</li>
            <li>Option 2</li>
            <li>Option 3</li>
          </ul>
        </div>
      </Popover>
    </div>
  );
}

export default ContextMenuExample;

In this example, clicking the “Right-click for Context Menu” button will open a context menu as a Popover, offering three options.

Error Messages and Validation

If you want to show error messages or validation feedback when a user interacts with a specific element, trigger Popovers to display such messages dynamically. You can use it in combination with form elements. Here’s an example of how to implement error messages and validation using a Popover:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import TextField from "@mui/material/TextField";
import Button from "@mui/material/Button";
import Popover from "@mui/material/Popover";
import Typography from "@mui/material/Typography";

function ValidationPopover() {
  const [anchorEl, setAnchorEl] = useState(null);
  const [inputValue, setInputValue] = useState("");
  const [error, setError] = useState(false);

  const handleOpen = (event) => {
    if (inputValue === "") {
      setError(true);
      setAnchorEl(event.currentTarget);
    }
  };

  const handleClose = () => {
    setError(false);
    setAnchorEl(null);
  };

  const open = Boolean(anchorEl);
  const id = open ? "validation-popover" : undefined;

  const handleInputChange = (event) => {
    setInputValue(event.target.value);
  };

  return (
    <div>
      <TextField
        label="Username"
        value={inputValue}
        onChange={handleInputChange}
        error={error}
        helperText={error ? "Please enter a username" : ""}
      />
      <Button aria-describedby={id} onClick={handleOpen}>
        Validate
      </Button>
      <Popover
        id={id}
        open={open}
        anchorEl={anchorEl}
        onClose={handleClose}
        anchorOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "right",
        }}
        transformOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "left",
        }}
      >
        <Typography>This is a validation error message.</Typography>
      </Popover>
    </div>
  );
}

export default ValidationPopover;

In this example:

  1. We use a TextField component to take user input. The error and helperText properties are used for displaying the validation error.

  2. The handleOpen function checks if the input is empty. If it is, it sets the error state to true and opens the Popover to display the validation error.

  3. The handleClose function is called when the Popover is closed. It resets the error state and closes the Popover.

  4. The Popover component displays the validation error message when the error state is true.

When the “Validate” button is clicked with an empty input, the Popover will appear, showing the validation error message “This is a validation error message.” This is a simple example.

Navigation Menus

When a user clicks on a menu item, you can trigger a Popover to show additional navigation options or subcategories. This design approach is helpful for mobile applications with limited screen space.

Here’s a code example for implementing a navigation menu using a Material-UI Popover:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@mui/material/Button";
import Popover from "@mui/material/Popover";
import List from "@mui/material/List";
import ListItem from "@mui/material/ListItem";
import ListItemText from "@mui/material/ListItemText";

function NavigationMenuPopover() {
  const [anchorEl, setAnchorEl] = useState(null);

  const handleOpen = (event) => {
    setAnchorEl(event.currentTarget);
  };

  const handleClose = () => {
    setAnchorEl(null);
  };

  const open = Boolean(anchorEl);

  return (
    <div>
      <Button
        aria-describedby={open ? "navigation-menu" : undefined}
        onClick={handleOpen}
      >
        Open Menu
      </Button>
      <Popover
        id="navigation-menu"
        open={open}
        anchorEl={anchorEl}
        onClose={handleClose}
        anchorOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "right",
        }}
        transformOrigin={{
          vertical: "top",
          horizontal: "left",
        }}
      >
        <List>
          <ListItem button>
            <ListItemText primary="Home" />
          </ListItem>
          <ListItem button>
            <ListItemText primary="Profile" />
          </ListItem>
          <ListItem button>
            <ListItemText primary="Settings" />
          </ListItem>
          <ListItem button>
            <ListItemText primary="Logout" />
          </ListItem>
        </List>
      </Popover>
    </div>
  );
}

export default NavigationMenuPopover;

In this example:

  1. We have a Button element labeled “Open Menu.” When clicked, it triggers the Popover to open, displaying the navigation menu options.

  2. The Popover component contains a List of ListItem components, each representing a menu item. You can add more menu items and customize them according to your application’s requirements.

  3. The handleOpen function sets the anchorEl state to the current event target, which determines the position of the Popover. When you click the “Open Menu” button, the Popover appears next to the button.

  4. The handleClose function closes the Popover when the user clicks outside of it or selects a menu item.

  5. The open variable controls whether the Popover is open or closed.

Other use cases include:

  • Information Panels: Display supplementary information when users click on an item, helping them make informed decisions. For example, in a product catalog, you can use Popovers to show detailed product descriptions, specifications, and customer reviews when a user clicks on a product card.

  • Interactive Forms: Use Popovers to house interactive forms or input fields, allowing users to update information without navigating away from the current page.

  • Image Previews: Popovers work well for image previews. You can use a Popover to display a larger version of an image when a user clicks on a thumbnail, allowing for a closer look without navigating to a separate image viewer.

  • Help and Documentation: In complex applications or websites, you can use Popovers to provide contextual help and documentation. When users click a help icon or question mark, a Popover can display relevant information, tips, or links to detailed documentation without leaving the current page.

  • Interactive Charts and Graphs: If your application includes interactive data visualizations, Popovers can display additional information or data points when a user hovers over specific chart elements. It provides users with on-demand insights while keeping the primary visualization uncluttered.

  • User Profile PopUps: In social networking or e-commerce applications, Popovers can show user profile information, including a user’s name, avatar, and summary, when clicking on their profile picture or username. It provides quick access to user profiles without navigating away from the current page.

  • Notification PopUps: When users receive notifications, Popovers can display a summary of the content, allowing users to read, dismiss, or take action on notifications without leaving their current context.

Wrapping Up MUI Popover

Material-UI Popover is a powerful tool for enhancing user interfaces in React applications.

Its versatility, customizability, and adaptability to various user interactions make it an excellent choice for creating dynamic and user-friendly pop-up elements.

Get started with purecode.ai today and ship code faster with PureCode’s AI-powered component code generator.

React MUI PopOver – Video Resource

You can also use libraries for Popvers in React.

By following the steps outlined in this guide and considering best practices, you can better integrate Material-UI Popover into your application, resulting in a polished and user-centric user interface experience.

Phil Butler

Phil Butler