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Use MUI Makestyles to Make Great Custom Design in React

In the realm of web design, the aesthetics of a user interface play a pivotal role in shaping user experience. The importance of custom styling cannot be overstated when it comes to creating visually appealing and unique web designs. Custom styling allows designers and developers to move beyond standard templates, enabling them to craft interfaces that align with brand identity and user expectations.

The aesthetics of a website or application significantly influence user perception and engagement. A well-designed and visually appealing interface enhances user satisfaction, fosters positive interactions, and establishes a memorable brand presence. Custom styling, as facilitated by tools like Material UI MakeStyles in React, empowers designers to infuse creativity into the design process, ensuring that the visual elements harmonize with the overall brand narrative. In essence, the aesthetics of web design, achieved through thoughtful custom styling, contribute not only to the visual allure of a site but also to the overall success and effectiveness of the user interface.

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Understanding Material UI Makestyles

Material UI makeStyles is one of the utility function provided by the Material UI library for React that allows developers to define and apply custom styles to their components. It follows a CSS-in-JS (JavaScript) approach, enabling the encapsulation of styles within individual React components. This approach promotes modularity and maintainability by keeping styles closely tied to the components they belong to.

With makeStyles, developers can create dynamic and responsive styles based on component props, states, or themes. It provides a concise and readable syntax for defining styles, making it easier to manage and understand the styling logic associated with each component.

Material UI MakeStyles is particularly well-suited for React applications, where components are crucial building blocks. By integrating styling directly into the components, it aligns with the component-based architecture, providing a convenient way to handle styles in a component-centric manner.

Getting Started with MUI Makestyles: Installing Material UI components and Basic Implementation of makestyles

To harness the power of Material UI Makestyles in your React project, follow these steps for a seamless integration.

Installation:

Start by installing Material UI in your React project if you haven’t already. You can use npm or yarn for this task:

npm install @material-ui/styles @emotion/react @emotion/styled

or

yarn add @material-ui/styles @emotion/react @emotion/styled

Once the installation is complete, you’re ready to dive into the world of Makestyles.

Basic Implementation:

Let’s begin with a simple example to understand the fundamental usage of Makestyles. Consider a React component where you want to customize the styling:

import React from 'react';
import { makeStyles } from '@material-ui/styles';

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  root: {
    backgroundColor: theme.palette.primary.main,
    padding: theme.spacing(2),
    borderRadius: theme.shape.borderRadius,
    color: theme.palette.primary.contrastText,
  },
}));

const App = () => {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <div className={classes.root}>
      <h1>Welcome to Material UI Makestyles!</h1>
    </div>
  );
};

export default App;

In this example, we use makeStyles to define a set of styles associated with the root class. These styles leverage the theme provided by Material UI, ensuring a consistent look and feel throughout your application. The classes.root is then applied to the root element of the component, showcasing the power and simplicity of Material UI Makestyles in action.

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Exploring Classes in Makestyles

Material UI Makestyles provides a robust mechanism for managing styles in React applications. Let’s delve into the world of classes offered by Makestyles and how you can create and utilize custom classes for personalized styling.

Makestyles generates a set of classes based on the style rules you define. These classes are then accessible in your React components, allowing you to apply styles dynamically. When you invoke the makeStyles function, it returns a hook that you can use to access these generated classes.

Here’s a basic example:

import { makeStyles } from '@material-ui/styles';

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  root: {
    backgroundColor: theme.palette.primary.main,
    padding: theme.spacing(2),
    borderRadius: theme.shape.borderRadius,
    color: theme.palette.primary.contrastText,
  },
  // Additional styles can be defined here
}));

const App = () => {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <div className={classes.root}>
      <h1>Styled with Makestyles!</h1>
    </div>
  );
};

export default App;

In this example, the useStyles hook provides access to the generated root class, and it’s applied to the corresponding element in the component.

In Material UI, the makeStyles hook not only generates styles but also provides a convenient way to access generated class names. This feature proves valuable when you need to dynamically apply styles based on certain conditions or user interactions. Let’s explore how to retrieve and use class names with Makestyles.

Consider the following example:

import { makeStyles } from '@material-ui/styles';

const useStyles = makeStyles({
  primaryText: {
    color: 'blue',
  },
  secondaryText: {
    color: 'green',
  },
});

function StyledText({ isPrimary }) {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <div className={isPrimary ? classes.primaryText : classes.secondaryText}>
      {/* Your text content */}
    </div>
  );
}

In this example, two classes, primaryText and secondaryText, are generated by Makestyles. The StyledText component conditionally applies one of these classes based on the isPrimary prop. This dynamic styling is achieved by leveraging the generated class names.

Makestyles enables you to access these class names directly through the classes object. This allows for more flexibility and control over styling logic within your components.

Additionally, Makestyles supports combining multiple classes for a single element. Let’s extend the previous example:

import { makeStyles } from '@material-ui/styles';

const useStyles = makeStyles({
  primaryText: {
    color: 'blue',
  },
  boldText: {
    fontWeight: 'bold',
  },
});

function StyledText({ isPrimary, isBold }) {
  const classes = useStyles();

  // Combining classes dynamically
  const combinedClasses = isPrimary ? classes.primaryText : '';
  const finalClasses = isBold ? `${combinedClasses} ${classes.boldText}` : combinedClasses;

  return (
    <div className={finalClasses}>
      {/* Your text content */}
    </div>
  );
}

Here, the StyledText component can now receive both isPrimary and isBold props, dynamically combining classes based on these conditions. The generated class names from Makestyles become building blocks for dynamic and responsive styling in your React components.

Creating Custom Classes:

While the generated classes are powerful, there might be scenarios where you need custom styling for specific elements. Makestyles allows you to define and use custom classes effortlessly:

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  customClass: {
    fontSize: '2rem',
    fontWeight: 'bold',
    color: theme.palette.secondary.main,
  },
}));

const MyStyledComponent = () => {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <div>
      <h1 className={`${classes.root} ${classes.customClass}`}>Custom Styled Heading</h1>
    </div>
  );
};

Here, the customClass is created and applied to the heading element alongside the generated root class, showcasing the flexibility of Material UI Makestyles in handling both predefined and custom styling needs.

Custom Styling with Makestyles

Material UI Makestyles serves as a powerful tool for crafting custom styles in React applications, offering flexibility and ease of use. Let’s explore how Makestyles can be employed for background styling, spacing and padding adjustments, and seamless theme customization.

Background Styling:

Customizing background styles is a common requirement in web development, and Makestyles simplifies this process. Below is an example illustrating how to apply a custom background color using Makestyles:

import { makeStyles } from '@material-ui/styles';

const useStyles = makeStyles({
  customBackground: {
    backgroundColor: '#ffee58', // Custom background color
    padding: '16px', // Adding padding for spacing
  },
});

function CustomStyledComponent() {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <div className={classes.customBackground}>
      {/* Your component content */}
    </div>
  );
}

Spacing and Padding:

Makestyles offers a straightforward approach to handle spacing and padding within components. The following example demonstrates how to utilize Makestyles for managing spacing and applying padding:

import { makeStyles } from '@material-ui/styles';

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  customSpacing: {
    margin: theme.spacing(2), // Applying theme-based spacing
    padding: '12px', // Custom padding
  },
});

function SpacedComponent() {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <div className={classes.customSpacing}>
      {/* Your component content */}
    </div>
  );
}

Theme Customization:

Material UI’s theming capabilities enhance the consistency of styles across an application. Makestyles seamlessly integrates with the theme, allowing for global adjustments like theme color. Consider the following example:

import { makeStyles, createTheme, ThemeProvider } from '@material-ui/styles';

const theme = createTheme({
  palette: {
    primary: {
      main: '#4caf50', // Custom primary color
    },
  },
});

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  themedComponent: {
    color: theme.palette.primary.main, // Utilizing themed color
  },
}));

function ThemedComponent() {
  const classes = useStyles();

  return (
    <ThemeProvider theme={theme}>
      <div className={classes.themedComponent}>
        {/* Your component content */}
      </div>
    </ThemeProvider>
  );
}

Styling with "withStyles" in Material-UI

In Material-UI, the withStyles higher-order component is another approach to handling styles, offering flexibility and customization for React components. withStyles provides a straightforward way to inject styles into a component, making it an excellent choice for more granular control over styling.

Here’s an example of how to use withStyles :

import React from 'react';
import { withStyles } from '@material-ui/core/styles';
import Button from '@material-ui/core/Button';

// Define styles as an object
const styles = {
  root: {
    backgroundColor: 'purple',
    color: 'white',
    '&:hover': {
      backgroundColor: 'darkpurple',
    },
  },
};

// Create a functional component
function StyledButton(props) {
  const { classes } = props;

  return (
    <Button className={classes.root}>
      Styled Button
    </Button>
  );
}

// Apply styles using withStyles
const StyledButtonWithStyles = withStyles(styles)(StyledButton);

export default StyledButtonWithStyles;
  • Import the necessary components from Material-UI, including withStyles for styling.
  • Create a JavaScript object (styles) containing the desired styling properties for the component.
  • Develop a functional React component (e.g., styledButton) that will receive the styles.
  • Use the withStyles function to apply the defined styles to the component.
  • Pass the styles object as an argument to withStyles.
  • The withStyles HOC injects a classes prop into the component.
  • Use the styled component (styledButtonWithStyles) in your application.
  • It encapsulates both the component logic and its styles, promoting modularity.

Final Thoughts

As we wrap up our exploration of Material UI Makestyles, it becomes evident that this styling solution is more than just a tool—it’s a catalyst for design creativity. In the realm of web development, where aesthetics play a pivotal role, Makestyles emerges as a powerhouse that empowers developers to craft unique and visually appealing user interfaces.

One of the standout features of Makestyles is its ability to seamlessly integrate with React components, offering a modular and efficient approach to styling. This not only enhances the maintainability of codebases but also enables developers to iterate swiftly on the design front.

Furthermore, Makestyles provides a responsive and dynamic styling mechanism. The generation of class names allows for flexible styling logic, adapting to various scenarios and user interactions. This flexibility is crucial for crafting user interfaces that go beyond static designs, providing an engaging and personalized experience.

You could also refer to this free Material UI Makestyles tutorial to get further hands-on and understanding of mui styles

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Andrea Chen

Andrea Chen