Type to generate custom UI components with AI

Type to generate UI components from text

OR

Browse thousands of MUI, Tailwind, React components that are fully customizable and responsive.

Explore Components

How to Master MUI Styles for Consistent Design and Performance

Introduction: Understanding Material UI Styles

Welcome to this comprehensive guide on MUI Styles, a powerful styling system provided by Material-UI. If you are a web developer looking to create visually appealing and consistent user interfaces in your React applications, then MUI Styles is the perfect solution for you.

Material UI Styles follows the principles of Google’s Material Design, ensuring that your UI elements are not only aesthetically pleasing but also intuitive and user-friendly. Whether you are new to Material-UI or an experienced developer, this guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started with MUI Styles, customize your styles, and apply advanced techniques.

In this guide

  • We will cover various aspects of MUI Styles, starting with the installation process.

  • We will then dive into the three APIs provided by Material UI Styles: the Hook API, Styled Components API, and Higher-order component API.

  • We will also explore advanced techniques such as nesting selectors, adapting styles based on props, styling overrides, and global styles.

  • Additionally, we will discuss themes in MUI Styles and provide best practices for creating consistent and responsive designs.

  • By the end of this guide, you will have a solid understanding of MUI Styles and be equipped with the knowledge to create stunning user interfaces using Material-UI in your React projects.

    So let’s jump right in and explore the world of MUI Styles!

Installation

Before diving into the details of MUI Styles, let’s start by installing the necessary package.

To use MUI Styles in your React project, you need to install the @mui/styles package using npm. Open your terminal or command prompt and run the following command:

npm install @mui/styles

This will install the MUI Styles package and its dependencies in your project. Once the installation is complete, you can start using MUI Styles to generate and apply styles to your components.

Now that you have the package installed, let’s move on to the next section and explore how to get started with MUI Styles.

Getting Started

MUI Styles provides three APIs for generating and applying styles:

  1. The Hook API

  2. Styled Components API

  3. Higher-order component API.

Each of these APIs has its own unique approach and syntax but shares the same underlying logic.

Let’s explore each API in detail.

1. Hook API

The Hook API is a popular choice for generating and applying styles in Material-UI. It allows you to use the makeStyles hook to create style rules for your components.

To get started with the Hook API, import the makeStyles function from @mui/styles and define your styles within a functional component:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";
import { makeStyles } from "@material-ui/core/styles";

const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  button: {
    textTransform: "none",
    backgroundColor: "white",
    color: "blue",
  },
  maindiv: {
    position: "absolute",
    top: '300px',
    left: '250px'
  },
}));

const App = (props) => {
  const classes = useStyles();
  return (
    <div className={classes.maindiv}>
      <Button variant="contained" className={classes.button}>
        Learn MUI Styles With Purecode
	Using Hook API 
      </Button>
    </div>
  );
};

export default App;

In the above example,

  • we define a button class that will be applied to a <Button> element within the MyComponent component.

  • By using the className prop and passing in classes.button, we can apply the styles defined in the button class.

The Hook API also allows you to nest selectors and adapt styles based on props, which we will explore later in this guide.

2. Styled Components API

The Styled Components API provides another approach to styling components in Material-UI. It allows you to create styled components using the styled function.

To use the Styled Components API, import the styled function from @mui/styles and pass in the base component you want to style:

 import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";
import { styled } from "@material-ui/core/styles";

const MyButton = styled(Button)({
  // Define your styles here
  borderColor: "red",
  borderWidth: '20px',
  backgroundColor: 'blue',
  color: 'white'
});

const App = (props) => {
  return (
    <div style={{'position':'absolute', 'top':'250px', 'left':'90px'}}>
      <MyButton>
        Learn MUI Styles With Purecode
        Using Styled Components API
      </MyButton>
    </div>
  );
};

export default App;

In the above example,

  • we create a styled version of the Button component and assign it to the MyButton variable.

  • We can then use <MyButton> as a regular component, and the styles defined within the styled function will be applied.

The Styled Components API offers a concise syntax for defining styles inline with your components. It is a popular choice for developers who prefer a more declarative approach to styling.

3. Higher-order component API

The Higher-order component (HOC) API in MUI Styles allows you to apply styles using the withStyles HOC. To use the HOC API, import the withStyles function from @mui/styles and define your styles as an object:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";
import { withStyles } from "@material-ui/core/styles";
const styles = {
  button: {
    textTransform: "none",
    backgroundColor: "white",
    color: "blue",
  },
  maindiv: {
    position: "absolute",
    top: "300px",
    left: "250px",
  },
};
const App = (props) => {
  const classes = props;
  return (
    <div className={classes.maindiv}>
      <Button variant="contained" className={classes.button}>
        Learn MUI Styles With Purecode Using Higher Order Component API
      </Button>
    </div>
  );
};
export default withStyles(styles)(App);

In the above example,

  • We define our styles as an object and pass them to the withStyles function along with the component we want to style.

  • This enhances the MyComponent component with the classes prop, which contains the generated CSS class names.

  • We can then apply the styles by using classes.root as the value for the className prop.

The HOC API is a flexible approach to styling components and is suitable for more complex cases where you need to enhance existing components with additional styles.

Now that we have covered the basics of each API, let’s move on to more advanced techniques in MUI Styles.

Refer to official docs at mui.com to know more about the APIs discussed above

Nesting Selectors

  • In MUI Styles, you can nest selectors to target elements inside a class or component.

  • This allows you to define styles for specific child elements without having to create separate CSS classes.

  • Let’s take a look at an example using the Hook API:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";
import { makeStyles } from "@material-ui/core/styles";
const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  button: {
    textTransform: "none",
    backgroundColor: "white",
    color: "blue",
    '& p': {
      color: 'green',
      '& span': {
        color: 'blue',
      },
    },
  },
  maindiv: {
    position: "absolute",
    top: '300px',
    left: '90px',
  }
}));
const App = (props) => {
  const classes = useStyles();
  return (
    <div className={classes.maindiv}>
      <Button variant="contained" className={classes.button}>
         <p>Learn Nested Selectors
         <span> With Tailwind CSS </span>
         & Purecode </p>
      </Button>
    </div>
  );
};
export default App;

In the above example,

  • We define a button class with nested selectors for <p> and <span> elements.

  • The <p> element will have a green color, and any <span> element inside it will have a blue color.

  • This nesting structure allows you to create complex styles with ease.

By using nesting selectors, you can easily target specific elements within your components and apply different styles based on their hierarchy. This helps in achieving more granular control over your UI elements and ensures consistency throughout your design.

Remember that nesting selectors can be used with any of the three APIs provided by MUI Styles. Experiment with different nesting structures and explore the possibilities of creating intricate and visually appealing designs.

Now that we understand how to nest selectors in MUI Styles, let’s move on to adapting styles based on props.

Adapting Based on Props

MUI Styles allows you to pass a function to the makeStyles hook or the style rule level to adapt the generated value based on the component’s props. This allows you to create dynamic styles that can change based on user interactions or data-driven conditions.

Let’s take a look at an example using the Hook API:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";
import { makeStyles } from "@material-ui/core/styles";
const useStyles = makeStyles((theme) => ({
  button: {
    textTransform: "none",
    backgroundColor: (props) => props.backgroundColor,
    color: (props) => props.color,
    '& p': {
      color: (props) => props.color,
      '& span': {
        color: 'green',
      },
    },
  },
  maindiv: {
    position: "absolute",
    top: '300px',
    left: '90px',
  }
}));
const App = () => {
  const props = {
    backgroundColor: 'black',
    color: 'white',
  };
  const classes = useStyles(props);
  return (
    <div className={classes.maindiv}>
      <Button variant="contained" className={classes.button}>
         <p>Styling Based on 
         <span> Props </span>
         Dynamic Styling </p>
      </Button>
    </div>
  );
};
export default App;

In the above example,

  • we define two classes: button and maindiv.

  • In the button class, we can then use the background color prop from props to dynamically set the background color of the element.

  • Similarly, the p and span class takes a function that accesses the color prop directly. By passing in the color prop from props, we can dynamically set the text color of the element.

By leveraging this feature of MUI Styles, you can create flexible and adaptable styles that respond to changes in your component’s props. This enables you to create dynamic user interfaces that provide a personalized experience.

It is time to turn your Figma designs into reality by using these dynamic styling solutions provided by MUI styles, along with taking the help of AI tools by Purecode to make your development journey much more easier and efficient.

Now that we have explored adapting styles based on props, let’s move on to styling overrides in MUI Styles.

Styling Overrides

MUI Styles provides multiple ways to override the default styles of Material-UI components. Whether you’re using the Hook API, Styled Components API, or Higher-order component API, you can easily customize the styles to match your design vision.

Let’s take a look at an example using the Styled Components API:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";
import { styled } from "@material-ui/core/styles";
const MyButton = styled(Button)(({ theme }) => ({
  background: theme.palette.primary.main,
  color: theme.palette.common.white,
}));
const App = (props) => {
  return (
    <div style={{'position':'absolute', 'top':'250px', 'left':'90px'}}>
      <MyButton>
        Overriding Default Styles
      </MyButton>
    </div>
  );
};
export default App;

In the above example,

  • We create a styled version of the Button component using the styled function.

  • Within the function, we have access to the theme object, which contains various values defined in the Material-UI theme.

  • By using the theme.palette.primary.main value for the background color and theme.palette.common.white for the text color, we override the default styles of the Button component.

  • This ensures that our custom button aligns with our design choices while maintaining consistency with other components in the Material-UI ecosystem.

Styling overrides can be applied to any Material-UI component, giving you complete control over their appearance. Whether you want to tweak a particular style property or completely redefine the look of a component, MUI Styles offers a flexible solution.

Now that we have covered styling overrides, let’s move on to global styles in MUI Styles.

Global Styles

  • In addition to component-level styling, MUI Styles allows you to add global baseline styles object for HTML elements using the GlobalStyles component.

  • This enables you to define consistent styles across your entire application without having to manually style each individual element.

Let’s take a look at an example:

import { GlobalStyles } from '@mui/styles';
const App = () => {
  return (
    <>
      <GlobalStyles styles={{ h1: { color: 'grey' } }} />
      <h1>Grey h1 element</h1>
    </>
  );
};

In the above example,

  • we import the GlobalStyles component from @mui/styles and use it to define a global style for <h1> elements.

  • By setting the color to ‘grey’, we ensure that all <h1> elements within our application have the same consistent style.

Global styles are particularly useful when you want to maintain a cohesive design throughout your application. By defining styles at a global level, you can easily update and manage the appearance of multiple elements without having to modify each one individually.

Now that we have explored global styles, let’s move on to theming in MUI Styles.

Theming

Theming is an important aspect of Material UI Styles as it allows you to create a consistent look and feel across your application. Material-UI provides the ThemeProvider component to define and customize the theme for your application.

To get started with theming, wrap your root component with the ThemeProvider and pass in a theme object:

import { ThemeProvider } from '@mui/styles';
import { createTheme } from '@mui/material/styles';
const theme = createTheme({
  // Define your customized theme here
});
const App = () => {
  return (
    <ThemeProvider theme={theme}>
      {/* Your application components */}
    </ThemeProvider>
  );
};

In the above example,

  • We import the ThemeProvider component from @mui/styles and the createTheme function from @mui/material/styles.

  • We then create a customized theme object by calling createTheme, providing our desired customizations.

  • By wrapping our root component with the ThemeProvider and passing in the theme object, we make the theme available to all components within our application. This allows us to access theme values using the useTheme hook or the withTheme higher-order component.

Theming in MUI Styles not only provides a consistent look and feel but also makes it easy to customize various aspects of your application, such as colors, typography, and spacing. You can even create multiple themes and switch between them based on user preferences or application requirements.

Now that we have covered theming in MUI Styles, let’s move on to the best practices for using this powerful styling solution.

Follow this video to learn more about customizing themes in material ui
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyQlpX7lCRE

Best Practices

When using MUI Styles in your React projects, it’s important to follow best practices to ensure maintainable and scalable code. Here are some best practices to consider when working with MUI Styles:

A. Customize Themes

  • Customizing themes is a key aspect of Material UI Styles.

  • By customizing themes, you can maintain a consistent look and feel throughout your application.

  • Take advantage of the theme object’s properties to modify colors, typography, spacing, and other aspects of your design.

  • This allows you to create a unique visual identity for your application while still leveraging the power of Material-UI’s components.

B. Responsive Design

  • MUI Styles provides built-in support for responsive design through breakpoints defined in the theme object.

  • Utilize these breakpoints to create styles that adapt to different screen sizes.

  • This ensures that your application looks great on both desktop and mobile devices.

  • Experiment with Media Queries and conditional rendering to tailor the user experience based on the device being used.

C. Style Reusability

  • One of the great advantages of using MUI Styles is the ability to create reusable styles.

  • Encourage style reusability by composing styles using libraries like clsx or creating custom style functions that can be used across multiple components.

  • By organizing and modularizing your styles, you can save development time and ensure consistency throughout your application.

Now that we have covered best practices, let’s move on to some advanced techniques you can use with MUI Styles.

Advanced Techniques

MUI Styles offers several advanced techniques that can enhance your styling capabilities and solve complex design challenges.

Let’s explore some of these techniques:

1. Dynamic Theming

  • Dynamic theming allows users to choose between light and dark themes, providing a more personalized experience.

  • With MUI Styles, you can easily implement dynamic theming by creating multiple theme objects and allowing users to switch between them.

  • This can be achieved by leveraging state management libraries like Redux or React Context API to store the user’s theme preference.

2. Server-Side Rendering

  • Supporting server-side rendering (SSR) is crucial for providing a seamless user experience and improving performance.

  • MUI Styles provides the ServerStyleSheets utility, which ensures that styles are correctly applied on both the server and the client.

  • This avoids potential style mismatches and improves the overall rendering speed of your application.

3. Integration with Other CSS-in-JS Libraries

MUI Styles can be seamlessly integrated with other CSS-in-JS libraries like styled components or emotion. This gives you the flexibility to choose the styling solution that best fits your project requirements. By combining the power of Material-UI’s components with the styling capabilities of these libraries, you can create visually stunning and highly customizable user interfaces.

Now that we have covered advanced techniques, let’s conclude our guide on MUI Styles.

Unlock MUI Style’s True Potential

In this comprehensive guide, we have explored MUI Styles, a powerful styling system provided by Material-UI. We started by learning how to install the necessary package and then delved into the three APIs offered by MUI Styles: the Hook API, Styled Components API, and Higher-order component API.

We discussed advanced techniques such as nesting selectors, adapting styles based on props, styling overrides, and global styles. Additionally, we explored the importance of theming and provided best practices for creating visually appealing and consistent designs.

MUI Styles offers a flexible and intuitive way to style your React components, allowing you to create beautiful and user-friendly interfaces. Whether you’re a seasoned developer or just starting with React, MUI Styles can significantly enhance your development process.

So why wait? Start using MUI Styles in your projects and unlock the full potential of Material-UI’s powerful styling system. Happy coding!

Yash Poojari

Yash Poojari