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Master MUI Table: A Guide for Presenting Data Easily

Material-UI is a popular library in the React ecosystem that implements Google’ps Material Design. It provides a rich set of pre-styled components that are fully customizable, enabling developers to create visually appealing and functional web applications with ease. One of which is MUI table.

This article focuses on a particularly useful component of Material UI: Tables are a fundamental part of table data presentation in web applications, and Material-UI makes working with them a breeze. This comprehensive guide will walk you through everything you need to know to master Material-UI Tables. and how to use them effectively in your projects.

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Understanding Material-UI

Material-UI is an open-source component library that implements Google’s Material Design principles. It offers a wide variety of pre-styled components, from simple buttons and checkboxes to complex dialog boxes and tables, that can be fully customized to fit your project’s needs. The use of Material-UI can significantly speed up the development process, as it reduces the need to write custom CSS for each component.

The design philosophy behind Material-UI is Material Design, a design language developed by Google. It aims to create a visual language that synthesizes the classic principles of good design with the innovation and possibility of technology and science. Material-UI brings this philosophy to web development, providing components that are visually pleasing, functionally robust, and easy to use.

Getting Started with Material-UI Tables

Setting up your project

To begin mastering Material-UI Tables, you need to set up a React project. If you haven’t done this before, don’t worry; we’ve got you covered. Follow these steps to get started:

Step 1: Create a React App

If you don’t have a React app already, create one using create-react-app:

npx create-next-app@latest mui-table

Step 2: Install Material-UI

Next, add Material-UI to your project using npm or yarn:

npm install @mui/material @emotion/react @emotion/styled

OR

yarn add @mui/material @emotion/react @emotion/styled

Step 3: Start your app

Run your app using the following command

npm run dev

Your app should now be up and running on localhost:3000

Introduction to Material-UI Tables

Material-UI provides a comprehensive set of components for creating tables. These tables are not just visually appealing; they are also highly customizable and functional.

Basic Table Example

Here’s a example of a Material-UI simple table:

import {
  Table,
  TableBody,
  TableCell,
  TableContainer,
  TableHead,
  TableRow,
  Paper,
} from '@mui/material';

export default function Home() {
  return (
    <>
      <TableContainer component={Paper}>
        <Table>
          <TableHead>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>Name</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Age</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Country</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
          </TableHead>
          <TableBody>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>John Doe</TableCell>
              <TableCell>28</TableCell>
              <TableCell>USA</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
          </TableBody>
        </Table>
      </TableContainer>
    </>
  );
}

This code creates a simple table with columns for Name, Age, and Country. You can customize the simple table’s column header and column values or other data and appearance according to your project’s needs.

Real-world examples

To truly understand and master Material-UI Tables, it’s essential to see how they’re used in real-world scenarios. Here are a couple of practical examples:

Example 1: Product Orders

Imagine you’re building an e-commerce website. You can use Material-UI Tables to display product information such as name, total price, and status of the products ordered. You can even add functionality like sorting and filtering to enhance the user experience.

https://mantisdashboard.io/dashboard/default
https://mantisdashboard.io/dashboard/default

Example 2: Customer Management

In an customer management application, Material-UI Tables can be used to showcase customers data, including name, department, country, contact information, etc. With advanced features like pagination and row selection, you can create a powerful employee management tool.

mantisdashboard

Diving Deeper into Material-UI Tables

Now that you’re familiar with the basics, let’s dive deeper into Material-UI Tables and understand the core components that make them tick.

Table Components

Material-UI provides several essential components for creating tables:

TableCell

The TableCell component in Material-UI is used to create individual cells in a table. It renders a <th> element when the parent context is a header, otherwise, it renders a <td> element. This component accepts several props that allow you to customize its appearance and behavior. These include alignment of the text, the component used for the root node, padding applied to the cell, cell size, and the cell type.

import TableCell from '@mui/material/TableCell';

// Inside your component's render method:
<TableCell align="right">Cell Content</TableCell>

TableRow

The TableRow component is used to create individual rows in a table. It automatically sets dynamic row height based on the Material-UI table element parent (head, body, etc). You can customize its appearance with CSS using the class names provided by Material-UI.

import TableRow from '@mui/material/TableRow';

// Inside your component's render method:
<TableRow>
  <TableCell>Cell Content</TableCell>
</TableRow>

TableHead

The TableHead component is used to create the header section of a table. It usually contains TableRow components, which in turn contain TableCell components. You can customize its appearance with CSS using the class names provided by Material-UI.

import TableHead from '@mui/material/TableHead';

// Inside your component's render method:
<TableHead>
  <TableRow>
    <TableCell>Header Cell Content</TableCell>
  </TableRow>
</TableHead>

TableBody

The TableBody component is used to create the table body section. Like TableHead, it usually contains TableRow components. You can customize its appearance with CSS using the class names provided by Material-UI.

import TableBody from '@mui/material/TableBody';

// Inside your component's render method:
<TableBody>
  <TableRow>
    <TableCell>Body Cell Content</TableCell>
  </TableRow>
</TableBody>

Table

The Table component in Material-UI corresponds closely to the native HTML <table> element. The table component serves as a container for all other table-related components like TableHead, TableBody, TableRow, TableCell, and so on. This table component is usually the parent component for a Material-UI table structure.

import Table from '@mui/material/Table';

// Inside your component's render method:
<Table>
  {/* Your table content */}
</Table>

TableContainer

The TableContainer component in Material-UI is used as a parent component for a table. It helps to group all the table components together. It can take a component which will be used as the container for the table.

import TableContainer from '@mui/material/TableContainer';
import Paper from '@mui/material/Paper';

// Inside your component's render method:
<TableContainer component={Paper}>
  <Table>
    {/* Your table content */}
  </Table>
</TableContainer>

In a typical Material-UI table, you would use these components together to create a complete table with a header, body, and rows of cells.

Table Props

Align Prop

The align prop in Material-UI is used to align the content of a TableCell component. It accepts three values: “inherit”, “left”, “center”, and “right”. The default value is “inherit”, which means the alignment will be the same as the parent component. Here’s an example of using the align prop:

<TableCell align="right">Country</TableCell>

Here the the complete code

import {
  Table,
  TableBody,
  TableCell,
  TableContainer,
  TableHead,
  TableRow,
  Paper,
} from '@mui/material';

export default function Home() {
  return (
    <Paper sx={{ width: '100%', overflow: 'hidden' }}>
      <TableContainer sx={{ maxHeight: 440 }}>
        <Table
          stickyHeader
          aria-label="sticky table"
          sx={{ bgcolor: 'text.secondary' }}
        >
          <TableHead>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>Name</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Age</TableCell>
              <TableCell align="right">Country</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
          </TableHead>
          <TableBody>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>John Doe</TableCell>
              <TableCell>28</TableCell>
              <TableCell>USA</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
            {/* Add more rows as needed */}
          </TableBody>
        </Table>
      </TableContainer>
    </Paper>
  );
}

Sticky Header Prop

The stickyHeader prop is used to make the table header sticky, meaning it will stay fixed at the top when you scroll down the table. This is useful when dealing with large tables where the user might need to scroll down to see more rows, but still needs to be able to see the column headers.

import {
  Table,
  TableBody,
  TableCell,
  TableContainer,
  TableHead,
  TableRow,
  Paper,
} from '@mui/material';

export default function Home() {
  return (
    <Paper sx={{ width: '100%', overflow: 'hidden' }}>
      <TableContainer sx={{ maxHeight: 440 }}>
        <Table
          stickyHeader
          aria-label="sticky table"
          sx={{ bgcolor: 'text.secondary' }}
        >
          <TableHead>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>Name</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Age</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Country</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
          </TableHead>
          <TableBody>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>John Doe</TableCell>
              <TableCell>28</TableCell>
              <TableCell>USA</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell>James Charles</TableCell>
              <TableCell>28</TableCell>
              <TableCell>USA</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
            {/* Add more rows as needed */}
          </TableBody>
        </Table>
      </TableContainer>
    </Paper>
  );
}

Advanced Features of Material-UI Tables

Here are some advanced features you should know for MUI tables to make the most out of this component.

Pagination in Material-UI Table

Pagination is a feature that allows users to navigate through large data sets by dividing the data into smaller, manageable chunks known as pages. Material-UI provides the TablePagination component that can be used to add pagination controls to a table.

How to Implement Pagination in Material-UI Tables

Material-UI offers built-in components and functionalities to incorporate pagination in your tables. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

Step 1: First, import the necessary components and React hook:

import { useState } from 'react';
import {
  Table,
  TableBody,
  TableCell,
  TableContainer,
  TableHead,
  TableRow,
  Paper,
  TablePagination
} from '@mui/material';

Step 2: Next, add your state variables:

const [page, setPage] = useState(0);
const [rowsPerPage, setRowsPerPage] = useState(5); // Set the number of rows per page

Here, we use the useState hook to create page and rowsPerPage state variables, which will help manage the current page and the number of rows to display per page.

Step 3: Data Initialization:

const rows = [
    // Add your data here
    { name: 'John Doe', age: 28, country: 'USA' },
    { name: 'James Charles', age: 28, country: 'USA' },
    { name: 'Vince Pedro', age: 30, country: 'USA'},
    { name: ' Christian Trim', age: 24, country: 'USA'},
    { name: ' Tim Smith', age: 25, country: 'Austra'},
    { name: ' Christian Juge', age: 26, country: 'UK'},
    { name: 'Michael Smith ', age: 26, country: 'Poland'},
    { name: ' Joy Loud', age: 34, country: 'UAE'},
    { name: ' Yaba Lago', age: 27, country: 'NG'},
    { name: 'Doir Gucci', age: 40, country: 'Holand'},
    { name: 'Grace John', age: 28, country: 'Canada'}
  ];

We initialize the rows array with some sample data. You can add more rows as necessary.

Step 4: Handling Page Change:

const handleChangePage = (event, newPage) => {
     setPage(newPage);
   };

This function updates the page state variable whenever the user changes the current page.

Step 5: Handling Rows Per Page Change:

const handleChangeRowsPerPage = (event) => {
  setRowsPerPage(parseInt(event.target.value, 10));
  setPage(0);
};

This function is triggered when the user changes the number of rows per page. It updates the rowsPerPage state variable and resets the current page to 0.

Step 6: Rendering the Table and Pagination:

<Paper sx={{ width: '100%', overflow: 'hidden' }}>
  <TableContainer sx={{ maxHeight: 440 }}>
    <Table
     stickyHeader
     aria-label="sticky table"
     sx={{ bgcolor: 'text.secondary' }}
     >
      <TableHead>
       <TableRow>
        <TableCell>Name</TableCell>
        <TableCell>Age</TableCell>
        <TableCell>Country</TableCell>
       </TableRow>
      </TableHead>
      <TableBody>
        {rows
          .slice(page * rowsPerPage, page * rowsPerPage + rowsPerPage)
           .map((row, index) => (
             <TableRow key={index}>
               <TableCell>{row.name}</TableCell>
               <TableCell>{row.age}</TableCell>
               <TableCell>{row.country}</TableCell>
             </TableRow>
         ))}
      </TableBody>
    </Table>
   </TableContainer>
   <TablePagination
    rowsPerPageOptions={[5, 10, 25]} // Set the options for rows per page
    component="div"
    count={rows.length} // Set the total count of rows
    rowsPerPage={rowsPerPage}
    page={page}
    onPageChange={handleChangePage}
    onRowsPerPageChange={handleChangeRowsPerPage}
   />
</Paper>

Here, we render the Table component and the TablePagination component within the Paper component. The TablePagination component handles the pagination functionality. We pass the necessary props, including the rowsPerPageOptions, count, rowsPerPage, page, and event handlers for page changes and rows per page changes.

Sorting in Material-UI Table

To implement default sorting functionality in the Material UI table, you will need to do the following steps:

Step 1: Add state for sorting:

You can add a state for the current sorting field and direction (ascending or descending). For example:

const [orderBy, setOrderBy] = useState('name');
const [order, setOrder] = useState('asc');

Step 2: Create a sorting function:

Write a function that can handle the sorting logic based on the selected field and direction. This function should be able to update the rows accordingly. For example:

const handleSortRequest = (property) => {
  const isAsc = orderBy === property && order === 'asc';
  setOrder(isAsc ? 'desc' : 'asc');
  setOrderBy(property);
};

Step 3: Implement sorting helper functions:

Implement three helper functions, descendingComparator, sortedRowInformation and getComparator, to ensure stable sorting of the rows. These functions should be able to compare and sort the rows based on the selected field and direction. An example of these functions is provided below:

const descendingComparator = (a, b, orderBy) => {
  if (b[orderBy] < a[orderBy]) {
    return -1;
  }
  if (b[orderBy] > a[orderBy]) {
    return 1;
  }
  return 0;
};

const getComparator = (order, orderBy) => {
  return order === 'desc'
    ? (a, b) => descendingComparator(a, b, orderBy)
    : (a, b) => -descendingComparator(a, b, orderBy);
};

// This will be used to sort the rows
const sortedRowInformation = (rowArray, comparator) => {
  const stabilizedRowArray = rowArray.map((el, index) => [el, index]);
  stabilizedRowArray.sort((a, b) => {
    const order = comparator(a[0], b[0]);
    if (order !== 0) return order;
    return a[1] - b[1];
  });
  return stabilizedRowArray.map((el) => el[0]);
};

Step 4: Add sorting indicators to the table headers:

Update the table headers to include sorting indicators and attach the sorting function to the headers. For example:

<TableHead>
  <TableRow>
    <TableCell>
      <TableSortLabel
        active={orderBy === 'name'}
        direction={orderBy === 'name' ? order : 'asc'}
        onClick={() => handleSortRequest('name')}
      >
        Name
      </TableSortLabel>
    </TableCell>
    <TableCell>
      <TableSortLabel
        active={orderBy === 'age'}
        direction={orderBy === 'age' ? order : 'asc'}
        onClick={() => handleSortRequest('age')}
      >
        Age
      </TableSortLabel>
    </TableCell>
    <TableCell align="right">
      <TableSortLabel
        active={orderBy === 'country'}
        direction={orderBy === 'country' ? order : 'asc'}
        onClick={() => handleSortRequest('country')}
      >
        Country
      </TableSortLabel>
    </TableCell>
  </TableRow>
</TableHead>

Step 5: Adding the sort functions to the TableBody

In your TableBody, only render the rows for the current page, and sort the rows according to the current sort order:

<TableBody>
  {sortedRowInformation(rows, getComparator(order, orderBy))
    .slice(page * rowsPerPage, page * rowsPerPage + rowsPerPage)
    .map((row, index) => (
      <TableRow key={index}>
        <TableCell>{row.name}</TableCell>
        <TableCell>{row.age}</TableCell>
        <TableCell>{row.country}</TableCell>
      </TableRow>
  ))}
</TableBody>

Adding Captions to your Material UI table

To implement a caption in a Material-UI table, you can use the caption element which functions like a heading for a table. Most screen readers announce the content of captions. Captions help users find a table understand what it’s about and decide if they want to read it.

Here’s how you can implement a caption in your Material-UI table:

First, add a <caption> element directly inside your <Table> component:

<Table>
  <caption>A basic table example with a caption</caption>
  {/* rest of your table code */}
</Table>

The caption should be a short heading for the table content. For example, if your table contains information about users, you might use “User Information” as your caption. The <caption> element should be placed directly as a child of the <table> element.

How to easily Implement row selection using Material UI table

Step 1: Import Checkbox from Material UI

Aside from the basic table components, additionally, you will need to import the Checkbox component

import {Checkbox} from '@mui/material'

Step 2: Introduce State for Selection

Begin by initializing state variables for handling row selection. In this example, we use the useState hook to create the selected state to keep track of selected rows.

const [selected, setSelected] = useState([]);

Step 3: Handle Select All Functionality

Implement a function that handles the selection of all rows using a “Select All” checkbox. Update the selected state based on the rows that are selected or deselected.

 const handleSelectAllClick = (event) => {
     if (event.target.checked) {
       const newSelecteds = rows.map((n) => n.name);
       setSelected(newSelecteds);
       return;
     }
     setSelected([]);
   };

Step 4: Handle Single Row selection

Implement a function to handle row selection

const handleClick = (row) => {
     const selectedIndex = selected.indexOf(row.name);
     let newSelected = [];

     if (selectedIndex === -1) {
       newSelected = newSelected.concat(selected, row.name);
     } else if (selectedIndex === 0) {
       newSelected = newSelected.concat(selected.slice(1));
     } else if (selectedIndex === selected.length - 1) {
       newSelected = newSelected.concat(selected.slice(0, -1));
     } else if (selectedIndex > 0) {
       newSelected = newSelected.concat(
         selected.slice(0, selectedIndex),
         selected.slice(selectedIndex + 1)
       );
     }

     setSelected(newSelected);
   };

Step 5: Implement Checkbox for Row Selection

In your TableBody and TableHead, modify your TableRow to include a Checkbox for row selection, allowing users to select multiple rows. You will also handle the checkbox change events to update the selected rows accordingly.

Step 6: Modify Table Rendering Logic

Adjust the rendering logic to display checkboxes for each row, and manage the selected rows accordingly. You can use the isItemSelected variable to determine whether a particular row is selected or not.

<Paper sx={{ width: '100%', overflow: 'hidden' }}>
      <TableContainer sx={{ maxHeight: 440 }}>
        <Table
          stickyHeader
          aria-label="sticky table"
          sx={{ bgcolor: 'text.secondary' }}
        >
          <TableHead>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell padding='checkbox'>
                <Checkbox
                  indeterminate={
                    selected.length > 0 && selected.length < rows.length
                  }
                  checked={selected.length === rows.length}
                  onChange={handleSelectAllClick}
                />
              </TableCell>
              <TableCell>Name</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Age</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Country</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
          </TableHead>
          <TableBody>
            {rows
              .slice(page * rowsPerPage, page * rowsPerPage + rowsPerPage)
              .map((row, index) => {
                const isItemSelected = selected.indexOf(row.name) !== -1;
                return (
                  <React.Fragment key={index}>
                    <TableRow>
                      <TableCell padding="checkbox">
                        <Checkbox
                          checked={isItemSelected}
                          onClick={() => handleClick(row)}
                        />
                      </TableCell>
                      <TableCell>{row.name}</TableCell>
                      <TableCell>{row.age}</TableCell>
                      <TableCell>{row.country}</TableCell>
                    </TableRow>
                  </React.Fragment>
                );
              }
              )}
          </TableBody>
        </Table>
      </TableContainer>
    </Paper>
table cells row selection with MUI

How to easily Implement collapsable rows in Material UI

To implement collapsible rows, you can create a separate CollapsibleRow component. The CollapsibleRow component is a function component that receives props, and those props include the current row data. This component is responsible for rendering each row in the table and handling the open/close state for the collapsible part of the row.

Let’s break down the CollapsibleRow component with code example:

function CollapsibleRow(props) {
  const { row } = props;
  const [open, setOpen] = React.useState(false);

First, we destructure the row property from the props object. The row object contains the data for the current row that we are rendering. We also declare a state variable open and a function to update it setOpen. The open state determines whether the current row’s expansion status.

return (
    <React.Fragment>
      <TableRow>
        <TableCell>
          <IconButton
            aria-label="expand row"
            size="small"
            onClick={() => setOpen(!open)}
          >
            {open ? <KeyboardArrowUpIcon /> : <KeyboardArrowDownIcon />}
          </IconButton>
        </TableCell>
        <TableCell>{row.name}</TableCell>
        <TableCell>{row.age}</TableCell>
        <TableCell>{row.country}</TableCell>
      </TableRow>
   </React.Fragment>
  );
}

In the return statement, we start by returning a React.Fragment which is a common pattern for a component return value when you want to return multiple elements. Inside the React.Fragment, we render a TableRow component.

In the first TableCell, we have an IconButton which toggles the open state when clicked. If open is true, we display an up arrow; if open is false, we display a down arrow. This gives the user a visual cue about whether clicking the button will expand or collapse the row.

The rest of the TableCell components display the data from the row object.

<TableRow>
  <TableCell style={{ paddingBottom: 0, paddingTop: 0 }} colSpan={6}>
    <Collapse in={open} timeout="auto" unmountOnExit>
      <Box margin={1}>
        <Typography variant="h6" gutterBottom component="div">
          More Information
        </Typography>
        {/* Add more details about the row here */}
      </Box>
    </Collapse>
  </TableCell>
</TableRow>

Next, we add another TableRow which contains the collapsible content. This row will only be visible when the open state is true. We use the Collapse component from Material-UI to animate the opening and closing of the row. Inside the Collapse component, we can put any content we want to show when the row is expanded. In this case, we have a Typography component displaying the text “More Information”, but you can replace this with any custom content you need.

Then, use this component in your TableBody:

<TableBody>
  {rows
    .slice(page * rowsPerPage, page * rowsPerPage + rowsPerPage)
    .map((row) => (
      <CollapsibleRow key={row.name} row={row} />
  ))}
</TableBody>

Here is the complete code:

import React, { useState } from 'react';
import { Table, TableBody,TableCell,TableContainer,TableHead,TableRow,Paper, Collapse,IconButton,Box,Typography } from '@mui/material';
import { useTheme } from '@mui/material/styles';
import KeyboardArrowDownIcon from '@mui/icons-material/KeyboardArrowDown';
import KeyboardArrowUpIcon from '@mui/icons-material/KeyboardArrowUp';

export default function Home(props) {
  const [page, setPage] = useState(0);
  const [rowsPerPage, setRowsPerPage] = useState(5);

  const rows = [
    // Add your data here
    { name: 'John Doe', age: 28, country: 'USA' },
    { name: 'James Charles', age: 28, country: 'USA' },
    { name: 'Vince Pedro', age: 30, country: 'USA'},
    { name: ' Christian Trim', age: 24, country: 'USA'},
    { name: ' Tim Smith', age: 25, country: 'Austra'},
    { name: ' Christian Juge', age: 26, country: 'UK'},
    { name: 'Michael Smith ', age: 26, country: 'Poland'},
    { name: ' Joy Loud', age: 34, country: 'UAE'},
    { name: ' Yaba Lago', age: 27, country: 'NG'},
    { name: 'Doir Gucci', age: 40, country: 'Holand'},
    { name: 'Grace John', age: 28, country: 'Canada'}
  ];

   function CollapsibleRow(props) {
     const { row } = props;
     const [open, setOpen] = React.useState(false);

     return (
       <React.Fragment>
         <TableRow>
           <TableCell>
             <IconButton
               aria-label="expand row"
               size="small"
               onClick={() => setOpen(!open)}
             >
               {open ? <KeyboardArrowUpIcon /> : <KeyboardArrowDownIcon />}
             </IconButton>
           </TableCell>
           <TableCell>{row.name}</TableCell>
           <TableCell>{row.age}</TableCell>
           <TableCell>{row.country}</TableCell>
         </TableRow>
         <TableRow>
           <TableCell style={{ paddingBottom: 0, paddingTop: 0 }} colSpan={6}>
             <Collapse in={open} timeout="auto" unmountOnExit>
               <Box margin={1}>
                 <Typography variant="h6" gutterBottom component="div">
                   More Information
                 </Typography>
                 {/* Add more details about the row here */}
               </Box>
             </Collapse>
           </TableCell>
         </TableRow>
       </React.Fragment>
     );
   }


  return (
    <Paper sx={{ width: '100%', overflow: 'hidden' }}>
      <TableContainer sx={{ maxHeight: 440 }}>
        <Table
          stickyHeader
          aria-label="sticky table"
          sx={{ bgcolor: 'text.secondary' }}
        >
          <TableHead>
            <TableRow>
              <TableCell padding="checkbox">
              </TableCell>
              <TableCell>Name</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Age</TableCell>
              <TableCell>Country</TableCell>
            </TableRow>
          </TableHead>
          <TableBody>
            {rows
              .slice(page * rowsPerPage, page * rowsPerPage + rowsPerPage)
              .map((row) => (
                <CollapsibleRow key={row.name} row={row} />
              ))}
          </TableBody>
        </Table>
      </TableContainer>
    </Paper>
  );
}

This is how it will look

Expandable table with nested data

Alternatives to Material UI Table

While Material-UI Tables offer a lot of features and customization options, there are other libraries that you might find useful depending on your needs. Some popular alternatives include:

  • React Table: This is a lightweight, flexible, and powerful react table library for React. It doesn’t come with any pre-styled components, giving you complete control over the look and feel of your tables.

  • React Data Grid: The data grid library provides Excel-like grid components for React, complete with features like filtering, grouping, and editing.

  • Ant Design Table: This is part of the Ant Design library, a comprehensive UI library for React. It provides a feature-rich table component with a modern and clean design.

However, if you’re working with MUI whether to create tables or in any other capacity in your projects, you can speed up your UI development process using Purecode. Our AI-powered tool provides customized, ready-to-use components, saving you valuable time and effort. Experience the future of UI development with Purecode. Sign up now so that you’ll be the first to be notified when we launch.

Final Thoughts

Material-UI Tables are a powerful tool for displaying and manipulating data in React applications. They provide a wide range of features and customization options, and they adhere to the Material Design principles, resulting in visually pleasing and user-friendly tables.

However, like any tool, they are not a one-size-fits-all solution. Depending on your needs, you might find other libraries more suitable. It’s always a good idea to explore different options and choose the one that best fits your project.

Remember, the best way to master Material-UI Tables or any other tool, is through practice. So, roll up your sleeves and start coding!

To learn more about MUI table, you can check these helpful resources

Victor Yakubu

Victor Yakubu